EDITORIAL: CLASSROOM DANCING

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S. Shaver

Sydney Shaver, Staff Writer

Everybody likes to listen to some type of music while doing something. Whether it’s while doing chores, working out, or even doing homework, it makes whatever it is that we are doing seem like more fun and you can do it all faster. Music helps us focus on the task at hand. Why shouldn’t we be allowed to listen to it during class? I’ve heard that it distracts students from the topic that is being taught, but it generally has the opposite effect. You could put it on as a background noise or let students put in headphones while working on assignments. It’s a fun way to reward students for hard work or after taking notes during class lectures.

Music, for me, takes the stress of the workload off of my shoulders. It also allows to me to focus on one problem at a time instead of looking at the sheet and worrying about all the problems at once. It could also help students stay awake during class. In classes that are silent, I know that I am more likely to fall asleep while taking notes. I could’ve gotten eight hours of sleep the night before, but because I am so bored, I just can’t stay awake. It helps if the teacher is playing some kind of music or I have headphones in; it helps to keep the brain awake.

Now you’re probably wondering what type of music would be best. I’ve got an easy answer to that question. Most people think we can listen to classical music to stay focused but that just isn’t true. You can play whatever you want to listen to. You can play anything from Bach and Beethoven to Drake to Fall Out Boy.

Music can be helpful in so many ways around the classroom. It can help keep students awake and focused while doing work and giving the class a fun edge. It makes sense to play it loud and proud. Why don’t we?