RUNNING ON EMPTY

RUNNING+ON+EMPTY

C. Harlan

Shane Morehead, Staff Writer

3 weeks ago, a major leak at a Colonial pipeline in Alabama was detected near Birmingham. Since then, gas prices have gone up around thirty cents a gallon. Now, people are groaning over the sharp increase and governors from several different states are reportedly receiving a multitude of angry emails and complaints. It is believed that over 250,000 gallons of gas have leaked from the rupture in the pipeline. The pipeline is one of the largest in the Southeast area, providing gasoline for over fifty million people. Governor Nathan Deal has signed a temporary executive order waiving certain federal restrictions, allowing truck drivers to stay on the road longer to deliver fuel. Colonial is pumping extra gas from another a pipeline, and is also constructing a bypass around the impacted segment. A station in Hiawassee has seen an increase from $2.49 to $3.09 per gallon. Many of the gas stations that used to sell cheap gas are closed temporarily, while most of the gas stations that sold gas for a high price before the leak are still holding on. Most of the impact and the closing of stations are centered in and around Atlanta and other large southern cities, however; smaller places are feeling it too, such as here in Ringgold. Students and staff alike are complaining and chatting about the shortage. Two states of emergency have been declared amid the economic mess that has resulted from the accident. There shouldn’t be anything to worry about, though. Things like this will always work out, and we can all go back to our normal lives. We interviewed three different staff members about the subject of this gas shortage.

Shane Morehead: How has the gas shortage/price increase affected you?

Kevin Trobaugh: I had difficulty finding gas on a trip to Atlanta, but not much other than that.

SM: Do you think the crisis that has come as a result of the gas shortage is reflective of the dependence we have on fossil fuels and other such resources?

KT: No, it is the problem of people being reactive to the news and not really understanding the problem.

SM: Do you think there is anything people can do to prevent the severity of the recent problems caused by the shortage?

KT: Yes. A situation they need to understand is that gas was out there, and the price was going to go up for a bit. Production was not the problem, distribution was. People need to better understand the problem.

 

Shane Morehead: How has the gas shortage/price increase affected you?

Bobby Daniels: I don’t mind spending some extra money, so it isn’t that big of a deal for me.

SM: Do you think the crisis that has come as a result of the gas shortage is reflective of the dependence we have on fossil fuels and other such resources?

BD: No, it was just an accident.

SM: Do you think there is anything people can do to prevent the severity of the recent problems caused by the shortage?

BD: There’s really not much to do, it happens so fast.

 

Shane Morehead: How has the gas shortage/price increase affected you?

Tara Tollett: When I got back from a vacation, I had to go to 4 different stations to find gas, but I don’t have that problem anymore.

SM: Do you think the crisis that has come as a result of the gas shortage is reflective of the dependence we have on fossil fuels and other such resources?

TT: No.

SM: Do you think there is anything people can do to prevent the severity of the recent problems caused by the shortage?

TT: We should have a better infrastructure, and make stronger pipelines so they don’t leak.